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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
trying to read me the biography of lyndon johnson out loud from the first volume. we did not get that far because it is very, very long. one of his favorite books was "harry potter." >> could you talk a little bit about his initial reaction to the arrest and is the zeal of the prosecutors in massachusetts to go after him on the downloading of the jstor research articles? >> i was not with him -- we did not start dating more than a couple of weeks before this began. he tried really hard to wall it off. it was very stressful for him, but he tried to keep his friends and family as much as possible sort of isolated from this. he was very good at protecting other people. he was distressed by the fact the prosecutors had called two of his closest friends as witnesses at the grand jury, so he tried to protect everyone else by not giving us any information that would warrant being called as witnesses. the whole thing was just this big mistake and he helped the prosecutor's office would he had donethat' nothing illegal. as he put it, and the very few press releases he did around this, he did liken
as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the fun lobby." schieffer -- the gun lobby." schieffer called the president's speech yesterday one of his best and said the president will have too get his hands dirty to prevent another massacre. a columnist for the "seminole county public examiner" slammed the remarks saying, "whatever do you, mean bob. were no times were fdr, lbj or obama committing any crime against the constitution when they defeated the nazis, passed civil rights legislation or killed bin laden respectively." continuing "a little free advice for bob schieffer, if you feel the need to opine about historical events on national tv, please get your facts straight." we have pointed out before, president obama's opinions have changed from when he was a u.s. and state senator on the debt ceiling, prosecuting the war on terror and it seems on gun policy. back in 1999 with the shooting at columbine high schoolbe fresh in everyone's minds, the illinois state senate took up a bill that would require adult pr
is the enemy. lyndon johnson if you read about his efforts of mail order purchasing of guns, he moved that measure in a matter of months, and he was the master of this process. and he understood that time really was the enemy in terms of getting these measures through. to be the extent we can get a strong comprehensive package moving in the senate, get it out of the senate, and then basically surround the house with the executive branch senate action and public opinion that then i actually think this could get a life of its own and really have a strong chance. >> john: connecticut democratic congressman joe courtney, thank you for coming on the program. >> thanks, john. >> john: for more now on the president's proposals i'm happy to be joined by john rosenthal. stop handgun violence and common sense about kids an guns, and by pam simon a staffer for gabby giffords who was shot at the tucson shop shooting where the congressman was badly wounded and six others were killed. she's now a gun control advocate advocate. thank you both for joining us, john, i want to begin with you. >> thank
is it that they tend to go sour. >> lyndon johnson didn't even make it to the second term. he had to resign because of vietnam. ever since roosevelt and the amendment that limited his terms, presidents tend to run out of steam and maybe even get tripped up by scandal in these second terms. i think it's kind of a natural reaction to the fact that power is moving on beyond these presidents because, in fact, they are lame ducks. the obama white house has studied this very, very closely. they know the perils of the second term. they think they can avoid the worst pitfalls. first of all, they are saying there's no scandals on the horizon, but they say they can avoid the worst by having a focused agenda and moving fast. >> we'll see if they can. george, thank you very much. george will have a special inauguration edition of "this week" this morning. white house senior adviser david plouffe is on the show plus a special guest, eva longoria. >> ah, stay with abc news and "gma" for continuing coverage of inauguration 2013. we'll be live tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. with george and josh elliott co-anchori
him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said yeah we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything but
he utilize the power, the threat of power of the presidency the way lyndon johnson did with regard to resolutions during the course of the vietnam war? one senator voting against him, not being with him. frank church had voted against the vietnam war. lyndon johnson says the next time you want to damnen your district, call frank church. can barack obama utilize the inherent power of that office? >> if he has personal relationships -- lyndon johnson had remarkable relationships. they knew when lyndon called, lyndon meant business. the president needs to reach out a lot more. again, i know he's reached out, he's invited people over. we'd said a couple weeks ago he invited a lot of people over for spielberg to see "lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number
highest totals of filibusters every recorded. lyndon johnson faced one filibuster during his six years as senate majority leader. in the same span of time, harry reid has faced over 390. lyndon johnson, one; harry reid, 390. legislation is blocked at every turn. the result is not surprising. the senate of the 112th congress passed a record low 2.8% of bills introduced. that's a 66% decrease from the last republican majority in 20 2005-2006 and a 90% decrease from the high in 1955-1956. by every measure, the 112th congress was the most unproductive congress in our history. my republican colleagues have come to the floor and made many impassioned statements in opposition to amending our rules at the beginning of this congress. they say that the rules can only be changed with a two-thirds supermajority, as the current filibuster rule requires. they argue that any attempt to amend the rules by a simple majority is breaking the rules to change the rules. this is simply not true. the supermajority requirement to change senate rules is in direct conflict with the u.s. constitution. article 1,
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suzy or man is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. i was living with this all-over pain. a deep, throbbing, persistent ache. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia, thought to be the result of overactive nerves that cause chronic widespread pain. lyrica is believed to calm these nerves. i learned lyrica can provide significant relief from fibromyalgia pain. and for some people, it can work in as early as the first week of treatment. so now i can do more of the t
in order to bring us into a new era. one of the things that lyndon johnson said famously is that when a president is elected, he's for six months he's a giraffe and thereafter a worm, so his great challenge is going to be how he figures out how to make the most of this time as a giraffe. >> let's go back outside to so sole ya vega. >> i'm here. hey, good afternoon. we made our way over from the pentagon where we were at the staging area and came over on a bus full of teenager matching band from tennessee. they were really excited and we walked our way through the mall here and made our way close to the capitol. you can see a lot of the crowd is dissipating. a lot are headed over to that paid we'll see later this afternoon. we heard all of our friends, david muir and bill weir talking about the excitement and the level of excitement you can feel just walking through this crowd. it's so palpable. one woman i just met while making my way over stopped me in my tracks during the invocation, she literally had tears streaming down her face and i said why are you so emotional? she said my gra
john f. kennedy, george h.w. bush, lyndon johnson, president jimmy carter and we'll wrap up the night at 11 eastern with george w. bush's speech. starting tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> it was an important part of history. i felt it should be brought to bear. there had been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate in terms of what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for the historical record to present our perspective and for people to understand there were different policy choices and options, disagreements. and that if we want to prevent another crisis from happening again, i really felt the public itself needed to engage more on financial reform, educate themselves better. make it an issue with their elected officials. so i have some policy recommendations at the end of it that i hope people will look at. >> the former head of the deposit corporation on the government's worst financial crisis. her book is bull by the horns sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. yournl continues.
the inauguration on television. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bullet proof inaugural. ronald reagan's second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. bill clinton ushering in more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. >> i, william jefferson clinton. >> reporter: and president obama with the first lady by his side again after already making history four years ago in front of nearly 2 million spectators. david muir, abc news, washington. >> he'll be the first democrat in more than 75 years to get a majority of the popular vote twice. only five other presidents have done that in all u.s. history. i love the trivia behind inauguration. it's interesting to go back in the file that day. fascinating day for the obamas and for the country. so keep it here on abc news throughout this very big day. we'll be back. ev...direction for my life..... ...through my accomplishments... ...and now, with help... ...and support from my family and others, i own... i own my recovery... ...from addiction and de
nixon from 1969. john kennedy in 1961. george bush at 10:00 eastern at 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. the jakarta from 1977. at 11:00, george w. bush and his 2001 inauguration. -- lyndon johnson -- jimmy carter in 1977. that is coming up at 8:00 eastern tomorrow night on c- span. our inauguration coverage kicks off this weekend as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony is sunday at the white house. we will have live coverage. we will also include your phone calls. we will begin with a look back at president obama's 2009 inaugural address. then on monday, the public inaugural ceremonies with the swearing in at noon, the capitol luncheon, and a parade down pennsylvania avenue. coverage begins at 7:00 eastern here on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. join the conversation throughout the day on facebook and twitter. >> the greatest honor history can be so is the title of peacemaker. this honor now beckons america the chance to help lead the world of last out of the valley of turmoil and on to that high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since t
tell you, brian, this is -- it's unreal to me. it is unbelievable. as lyndon johnson would say it's like history and fate coming together. for this president, this african-american, to be inaugura inaugurated for a second time on martin luther king day and can look out and see the likeness of martin luther king. to see jefferson, to see lincoln. it is just unreal. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious amer
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
the civil rights act of 1964. it took lyndon johnson to probably send it forward. he overcame what seems to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetimes, we have served enough nontrivial policy changes to recognize the inherent iron grip of status quo forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks, we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance between individual rights and civic obligation will command sustained into serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists plied their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role in providing principled scaffolding for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health effects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun aussie and research, envisaged by our colleague, has provided a home for that study areas producing nationally recognized research and recommendations aimed at understanding and curtailing the impact
lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. i did not think there is a second term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should be removed from the white house dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over interpret. host: let me add, this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monocle and skin. only the second president -- monica lewinsky. only the second president to face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to use some of the political capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post,." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
control act, one of the last pieces of legislation assigned by lyndon baines johnson gives the president of the united states of america the authority to ban importation into the u.s. weapons that are not needed for the military or suitable for sport. stuart: that is legit? judge napolitano: hear me out. the president can use his judgment as to what is not suitable for sport. if he abuses that judgment, so as to curtail weapons for self-defense by saying you can use them because they are not usable for sport, that would be the use of an executive order because he would tell the justice keep arming the treasury department not to let these things coming and the effect of it would interfere with self-defense. stuart: i am bored with it. i don't care about 1968. judge napolitano: the same authority president obama has. stuart: tell me your judgment, if the president uses an executive order to command, demand background checks universally is that are unconstitutional. judge napolitano: he does not have the authority to do that. because that is an interference with the free trade in interstate
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
about a couple of facts. it is a fact that this coming march is the 49th anniversary of lyndon johnson declaring war on poverty. it is a fact we have spent over $16 trillion in those 49 years, and it has failed. i like your hashtag -- party must end. i agree entirely. but let me give you two dissenting views. the welfare reform program work. the greatest decrease in child poverty in america came under bill clinton with a republican congress in the late 1990's. that is just a fact. jeffrey is shaking his head. no, it is a fact. the lowest level of black children in poverty in history was 1997. you could make an argument that having a welfare system shift toward opportunity would work. >> i'm going to give you all the time you need. before that, what would you say then to those who read the "new york times" stories when they did to review 15 years after bill clinton's welfare to work program, that women and children were falling faster into poverty than anybody else? [applause] i too was the program that helped push them in there? were they wrong? -- it was that program that helped push
lyndon johnson's legislative genius to process forward, beat back resistance and over, what seem to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetime we observed enough nontrivial policy change to recognize that the iron grip of static coal forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the effect of regulation of guns and the appropriate balance between individual rights and civic obligations will command sustained and serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists apply to cases, and politicians will fight over the issues. we know that. and in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role providing principle holdings for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health affects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun policy and research, as visited by our colleague him has provided a home for the study, producing nationally recognized research and rec
kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing touches are going up. there is a presidential seal attached to a heated glassed in area. that is where president obama and michelle obama will watch the parade. the city of washington has spent $6.5 mil
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)